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A rippled API library in Go language

https://github.com/r0bertz/ripple

I have been working on this lately. It's a fork of its original one. I learned a lot since I started working on it.

Specifically, I learned there are a lot of inconsistencies in the output of rippled API.

See for yourself in https://github.com/rubblelabs/ripple/issues/36#issuecomment-383355198

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